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to the 1960, which was held in seattle. many of you probably were born then. so there was this modern monorail project to ferry people around the world fair in the investors of the project at the time offered to build a monorail system is a pilot program in los angeles, traversing the harbor freeway. dad thought it was a good idea but couldn't get any of the other city fathers are county fathers to agree that this is a good investment. nobody at that time so if you ever get people out of their beloved cars. so that monorail now circles disneyland's magic kingdom in anaheim consummately. but that is a reminder to me that the biggest mistake we've made so far is not helping major transportation projects that the public can use, we'll use it will get them out of their cars. in california i believe and i think the voters of proved that time and again that high-speed rail will reduce congestion, will create jobs and will modernize the entire's tastes real system. it will reduce congestion, which is a key issue for california. transportation congestion is strangling business potential of our state a
to a psychiatrist to evaluate you need, at drug or a test. i heard this one when i was in seattle too. you didn't put in tort reform and you get that in there and it's a real problem. we do need some changes in health care. health care. i'm on medicare now, so to mr. cooper and i have with me a denial from medicare. they have proved the needle but tonight the medication to go into the needle. this is absurd. for those of us working in health care, we are not surprised. it's absurd. medicare isn't that great as dr. makary in doctor saini. it can be good health care or working in conjunction with alternative treatment and confidentiality especially in mental health. i will tell you most mental health professionals are charging. are you going to charge me if i'm private practice? i don't think so. so tort reform, hopkins but alternative medicine and the issue of changing that group of people. the medicaid money. >> let's take the two questions to start because we tend to forget the third in and the fourth. >> mr. cooper if anyone wants to do a story, this is absurd, absurd to approve the needle an
, pictures of us in the seattle tacoma airport in the u.s.a. we weren't even in china. we were back the united states. they've know a kid who took that picture, but somehow it went viral and we were instantly recognized. even peddlers when we took our family and kids to experience the great wall for their first time, we were asked by everybody along the great while for pictures. so is overwhelming, very, very flattering on the chinese have been warm and gracious and very, very friendly. >> how much does it matter to them that your father was born in china? >> at the source of great pride that i'm chinese-american, that my ancestors are often china, a waste family is from china as well. in some ways they expect me therefore to take the chinese side on all the issues. [laughter] and shortly after i arrived in before i arrived there was some commentary over the internet this you have to look at the statement. he may be chinese on the inside, but these white on the outside. excuse me coming out on the outside, white on the inside. they called me a banana. [laughter] some said it was a t
of him for his manager policy experience and most recently served as chief of police for seattle washington where he last ran at its lowest point in 40 years. [applause] >> well, good morning and thank you very much for being here. this is a wonderful opportunity for me to associate again the future report with dr. walkoff and the staff that supports dr. johnson in the work he has done. the assistant secretary of health, dr. koh could not be a stronger partner on these issues in his words about the health of young people and responsibility we have as adults they think are particularly important. i'm looking forward to hearing from you and it's always a great pleasure to be with dr. johnson who has given us the information that helps so much and not only making policy, but also the information needed to improve the nation's health, particularly the health of young people. so there's a couple of important things that i really took from this report. but to put it a little bit into context, remembering this is the snapshot of the prior year and it's also helpful to think about where
a where you change with. today's stephen breyer said after the court decided the seattle and louisville anti-segregation cases overturned those. he said it is not a women want this so if you have quickly so much. and that was even before citizens united, which i think is the defining case so far of the roberts court. but remember, the conservatives of the 60s, 70s, moderate republicans. the core idea of conservatism at the supreme court was judicial restraint. the idea that courts should, if at all possible, do for to the elected branches of government. should not overturn laws lately. the liberals were always trying to overturn laws and he was potter stewart lewis powell and sandra day o'connor preaching judicial constraint. citizens united is the case were just a few years earlier, george w. bush had signed the mccain-feingold law. in two years earlier -- within two, four years earlier the supreme court had affirmed the constitutionality of the mccain-feingold law. but in a story i tell at greater length in the "the oath," the conservative majority converted a relatively minor dispute
of the moment. >> host: the book ends in 1989. but at this point, barack obama, so far lived in seattle and 1962 until 1967, back to honolulu and then back to indonesia. 1967 to 1971, back to honolulu, 79 to 1981, los angeles and then he moved to new york for columbia come he lived there for years, 1981 until 1985. in chicago for the first time in 1985 until 1989. then off to harvard law school. two more pieces of the book i would like to ask you about. we want to tie the story together. now we are in 1989. where is his father? >> his father died in 1982 in a car accident driving home drunk from a makeshift bar area -- when we were in nairobi, we saw the streets in the area where this took place in it was almost sadly inevitable. >> host: are his grandparents and mothers alive at this point? >> guest: yes, all three are alive. his mother died right before his book comes out. >> host: "dreams from my father" >> guest: yes, "dreams from my father." so she never got to see his political career at all. the grandmother was in many ways the study figure in his life. and she died a few days before he w
, a rental from chevrolet and drove it to seattle. it was not our rental. it was called stolen. and he came to me. i heard you're a mess. what about me. you're a mess. come on in here. you're a very salvageable human being. so we were linked at the hip way back there. that's a true story. he has done a beautiful job. it's a great book. i read it as a proofreader. add taken up. and then i read it as a reader would read a book. it had a lump. a lump in my throat. it's there. the beautiful book, and i love it. things could have been left out. [laughter] through, call then. would you step up. [applause] and that said, i need $300 bail. i'm working my way through school. i don't have 300. just a there. i need to marry her. saving myself for this primrose. and then in this room is another great and dear friend. and i won't tell you about dick cheney's experiences. especially the university of miami which would make mine pale. i tell you, we ran together in 1978. he ran for the congress to my ran for the senate. lenin taken danny and i have run every time one of those was running and neither of us
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7